Staller photo exhibit gives filmgoers a new perspective

By Taylor Yon
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

and Nijha Young
Baldwin High School

Moviegoers attending the Stony Brook Film Festival this month are also in for a second visual treat. The Faces and Places: Photographs from the Kellerman Family exhibit at the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery in the Staller Center runs parallel to the 10-day independent film festival, so attendees can visit while on campus.

The collection consists of more than 60 still photographs — in black and white and color — taken by 10 internationally renowned photographers including Walter Iooss, Kristin Capp, Ralph Gibson, and James Nachtwey. Iooss’ work features sports stars at rest and in action while Capp’s focuses on the humanity of people from around the world.

Karen Levitov, curator and director of the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University looks at photos of the Faces and Places exhibit on Friday, July 20. The exhibit features the work of famous photographers and encourages viewers to consider different cultures. (Photo by Brianna Depra.)

“I felt that these were very strong works by some really well-known fine art and documentary photographers,” said Karen Levitov, curator and director of the Zuccaire Gallery. “I’m really compelled by the work of Kristin Capp, who is a photojournalist. She has gone to Brazil and many other places around the world, capturing the people and the places in different areas.”

Levitov added that there were a number of other photographers whose work inspires viewers to consider different cultures worldwide.

The gallery is open and admission is free during the film festival from July 19 to 28 and August 27 to September 29.

Filmgoers may find the art experience both convenient and informative. One visitor said the art gave her a new perspective on the modern world.

“It lets people see the world in a way that’s different perhaps than the speed of everything that’s happening around them in terms of crazy politics, crazy social situations,” Corinna Kirsch of Conroe, Texas said. “It allows you to step back and to be able to imagine the world differently. It’s very important.”

Photos to Stay on Campus

After the exhibit closes in September, the photographs will find their way to many departments across campus for wider viewing. The photos were donated to Stony Brook University by alumna Katherine King Kellerman, whose family collected them over many years. The Kellerman family was motivated by the thought that the pieces could be enjoyed by a much broader audience, Levitov said, adding that the artwork will be distributed throughout the campus.

“After this, we’ll take this down, repaint the walls and put up a faculty exhibition,” she said. That exhibit will feature the photographic works of the Studio Art faculty.

Christian Miller: A journey through filmmaking

By Nijha Young
Baldwin High School

Christian Miller has showed interest in film since he began shooting YouTube videos on a friend’s channel in seventh grade.

Christian, a rising senior at St. John the Baptist High School in West Islip, was responsible for creating scripts and directing short comedy videos for the channel.

The oldest of four children, Christian has continued cultivating his interest in film throughout his high school years. On top of balancing a class schedule consisting of Creative Writing, Speech, AP Literature and U.S. History, among other courses, Christian contributed to the school’s newspaper and broadcasting department for the past three years.

Though Christian’s early film work focused mainly on comedy, his style expanded to various genres and perspectives over time.

“He goes through a variety of different things,” explained Andrea Miller, his mother. “Sometimes he’ll write from more of a historical, social studies, even current events nature and then it’s a little more straight-laced.”

Although Christian hopes to continue working on comedic movies in the future, Mrs. Miller said that he is also the type of person who is often willing to “try anything new.”

The West Islip teen’s experience, however, is not limited to what goes on behind the scenes of a production. Christian has also acted in a number of short films in addition to school productions like “The Music Man.”

The next step for Christian is deciding where to pursue his aspiration. At the moment, he is interested in attending Hofstra University or the University of Rhode Island. Whichever college Christian chooses, his field of study is not in doubt.

“I decided to stick with filming just because it made me happy when I did it with my friends,” Christian said.