Crazy last days

The past couple of days have been anything but calm. Everyone has deadlines to meet which leaves us all stressed and extremely tired by the time we clock back into our dorms. It has been raining lately, so our rooms have cooled down a bit.

On Wednesday night, we attended the Ducks game at Bethpage Ballpark. We didn’t go just for fun, we went to cover it for a news package we are all working on. My team (Team 3) is covering a story on the baseball clinic that is offered for young kids.

We took still photos and conducted videoed interviews which we then used to write a story  and put together a video on the clinics. My team works very well together and we all delegate our tasks to “divide and conquer.”

My biggest struggle has been video. I have never worked with a video camera before or edited a news video so this has definitely been a major learning experience.

We are currently working on a different package about Faces and Places which is an art exhibit in arts center on campus.

Staller photo exhibit gives filmgoers a new perspective

By Taylor Yon
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

and Nijha Young
Baldwin High School

Moviegoers attending the Stony Brook Film Festival this month are also in for a second visual treat. The Faces and Places: Photographs from the Kellerman Family exhibit at the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery in the Staller Center runs parallel to the 10-day independent film festival, so attendees can visit while on campus.

The collection consists of more than 60 still photographs — in black and white and color — taken by 10 internationally renowned photographers including Walter Iooss, Kristin Capp, Ralph Gibson, and James Nachtwey. Iooss’ work features sports stars at rest and in action while Capp’s focuses on the humanity of people from around the world.

Karen Levitov, curator and director of the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery at Stony Brook University looks at photos of the Faces and Places exhibit on Friday, July 20. The exhibit features the work of famous photographers and encourages viewers to consider different cultures. (Photo by Brianna Depra.)

“I felt that these were very strong works by some really well-known fine art and documentary photographers,” said Karen Levitov, curator and director of the Zuccaire Gallery. “I’m really compelled by the work of Kristin Capp, who is a photojournalist. She has gone to Brazil and many other places around the world, capturing the people and the places in different areas.”

Levitov added that there were a number of other photographers whose work inspires viewers to consider different cultures worldwide.

The gallery is open and admission is free during the film festival from July 19 to 28 and August 27 to September 29.

Filmgoers may find the art experience both convenient and informative. One visitor said the art gave her a new perspective on the modern world.

“It lets people see the world in a way that’s different perhaps than the speed of everything that’s happening around them in terms of crazy politics, crazy social situations,” Corinna Kirsch of Conroe, Texas said. “It allows you to step back and to be able to imagine the world differently. It’s very important.”

Photos to Stay on Campus

After the exhibit closes in September, the photographs will find their way to many departments across campus for wider viewing. The photos were donated to Stony Brook University by alumna Katherine King Kellerman, whose family collected them over many years. The Kellerman family was motivated by the thought that the pieces could be enjoyed by a much broader audience, Levitov said, adding that the artwork will be distributed throughout the campus.

“After this, we’ll take this down, repaint the walls and put up a faculty exhibition,” she said. That exhibit will feature the photographic works of the Studio Art faculty.

Sebastian Germosen: Looking beyond the Major Leagues

By Taylor Yon
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Sebastian Germosen is devoted to journalism, but sees it as a backup career if his dream of becoming a professional baseball player falls through.

“My goal is to go to the Major Leagues as soon as possible,” said the 16-year-old junior at Archbishop Molloy High School in Queens. “It’s my dream job and it’s what my life revolves around. But my backup plan if baseball doesn’t work out is to major in journalism.”

In pursuit of his goal, Germosen plays catcher and third baseman on the his school’s baseball team. His sports role model is José Altuve, a second baseman for the Houston Astros.

Germosen’s interest in journalism was sparked by attending a lecture last fall at Stony Brook University by longtime broadcast journalist Ted Koppel.

He is a staff writer on the school’s newspaper, The Stanner. “I like the newspaper club because it allows me to speak about topics outside of the school and allows me to express my ideas and thoughts on political or world issues freely,” he said.

Germosen’s interest in journalism was also piqued by watching CNN and Fox News.

It isn’t just journalism that makes school appealing to Germosen. “I really enjoy high school, making friends and learning in general,” he said. Germosen primarily takes honors classes and is successful in earning straight A’s. For his upcoming junior year, Germosen will be taking courses including U.S. History Honors, Pre-Calculus, Spanish 3 Honors, Physics Honors, Participation in Government and Constitutional Law.

His teachers and his parents are his biggest role models. “Sebastian is an excellent student and the brains of the family,” Germosen’s mother Erica said. And “he looks out for his little brother.”

In his free time,  Germosen reads, exercises, plays video games and a lot of basketball. “I enjoy these hobbies because they let me relieve myself after stressful days,” he said.

After high school, Germosen’s dream is to attend Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and major in sports management.

To keep his journalism options open, Germosen applied to the Stony Brook University’s Robert W. Greene Summer Institute for High School Journalists when his newspaper adviser mentioned it. “I felt relieved and excited when I learned I got accepted,” he said.

“My expectation of the program,” Germosen said, “is that it will be a wonderful program with great teammates and awesome coordinators, and I will learn a lot of new things about the journalism industry.”

Taylor Yon: Eyeing an FBI career

By Sebastian Germosen
Archbishop Molloy High School

Taylor Yon wants to perfect her journalism skills and use them for a career in the FBI.

“I have always had a passion for writing, and I enjoy putting all of my thoughts on paper, and journalism gave me the opportunity to write in a way that could be read and informing,” said the 16-year-old junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

Taylor’s experience in high school, scene of a massacre in  February, has driven her desire to become a part of the FBI.

Though she has no role models in the journalism industry, Taylor admires and respects The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian. She also watches CNN for news and inspiration for her writing.

Taylor has achieved academic success in high school, where she has taken advanced classes such as AP World History and French 2. This year, she will take AP Biology, AP Psychology and AP Language Arts. She said that these subjects will help “broaden my horizon.”

Taylor writes for her school newspaper, Eagle Eye. She is active in health and fitness clubs and enjoys many hobbies and activities, including soccer and tennis, taking hot yoga classes with her best friend and reading.

Taylor’s friends describe her as very outgoing and adventurous, due to her love of trying new  things. Her friends go to her for help with all academic subjects except for math. Taylor’s family [Note: all, who?]  describes her as a person who loves to travel and broaden her horizons by learning about different cultures.

Despite her interest in writing, Taylor wants to attend the University of Maryland or Penn State and major in criminal justice to achieve her goal of becoming an FBI agent.

Attending Marjory Stoneman Douglas — where a gunman killed 17 students and faculty — hasn’t been easy for the students, including Taylor. She has used the shooting as an opportunity to expand her interest in journalism and writes stories beyond the scope of her school.

“The whole world was looking to us, and journalism was an outlet that showed the world we are more than a school shooting,” Taylor said.

When asked about her stance on gun control after the shooting, she said her belief is that people should not have access to assault rifles unless they are in law enforcement.

“I am not anti all guns,” she said. “I strongly believe in the Second Amendment as well, but assault rifles to me are a weapon of war and all they do is cause mass destruction to our country.”

Taylor sees the Robert W. Greene Summer Institute for High School Journalists as a great opportunity for her to showcase her passion for journalism and to learn new things about the industry. Taylor learned about the program when her newspaper adviser, Melissa Falkowski, told her and her friend Zoe Gordon about it.

“I was and still am so excited to learn and grow from this program,” Taylor said. “I want to learn as much as I can while I’m there.”